Passing down intangible heirlooms

Passing down intangible heirlooms

I cannot remember the last time that I purchased something that would last long enough or be interesting enough to pass down to my grandchildren. What sort of reaction would a 10 year old have in 2065 when I hand over a second edition iPad? All of my money is spent on new edition, disposable objects. Timeless has become forgotten. Will the equivalent to a Honus Wagner rookie card ever exist? Everything is at our fingertips and in our pockets. My entire music collection is at the touch of a button, not to mention that my money spent on music is through services instead of purchasing albums… yes I know… I know, I said. And the same goes for movies. I don’t own a DVD player and haven’t bought a DVD since 2011. Gone are the days of rummaging through my Uncle’s VHS collection and pulling out old movies and discovering a relic of the past but through the cultural taste of a family member. 

Passing down heirlooms will become a thing of the past. We will be too obsessed with recycling, sustainability, and maximizing space and efficiency that we will unconsciously lose the passing down of heritage and culture. Objects are symbols and symbols are an excuse to pass down meaningful stories of personal and family history. And imbedded deep in those is a lesson in morality, which is what we should be passing down in the first place.

Hey Guys, take your hat off in a restaurant

Hey Guys, take your hat off in a restaurant

Ath-leisure is a sign of our time not activity.

Ath-leisure is a sign of our time not activity.